©2019 by metashop

Episode List

Find episode links and descriptions below.

Episode List

Launch and Introduction

This is the introductory episode of I Never Metadata, the podcast all about Metadata. In this episode I talk about my plans for the podcast, topics I expect to cover, and how I hope to bring you all the good content about metadata that you want to know. 

Episode 1 - Coming Soon!

Metadata Definition and Types

In this episode we start from the start. And there's no better way to begin than with a definition to lay the foundation. I also talk about the - not three - but four types of metadata that are commonly used to help you store, search for and find, manage and protect your content.

Episode 2 - Coming Soon!

Standards and Control

Standards are the essence of metadata. And control is the essence of standardization. In this episode I talk about the different types of standards applied to metadata including schemas, content standards, value standards and format standards (or encoding standards). I then discuss some well-used industry standards like Dublin Core and MODS, and how these three might crosswalk to each other in order to align across standards.

Episode List

Launch and Introduction

This is the introductory episode of I Never Metadata, the podcast all about Metadata. In this episode I talk about my plans for the podcast, topics I expect to cover, and how I hope to bring you all the good content about metadata that you want to know. 

Episode 1 - Coming Soon!

Metadata Definition and Types

In this episode we start from the start. And there's no better way to begin than with a definition to lay the foundation. I also talk about the - not three - but four types of metadata that are commonly used to help you store, search for and find, manage and protect your content.

Episode 2 - Coming Soon!

Standards and Control

Standards are the essence of metadata. And control is the essence of standardization. In this episode I talk about the different types of standards applied to metadata including schemas, content standards, value standards and format standards (or encoding standards). I then discuss some well-used industry standards like Dublin Core and MODS, and how these three might crosswalk to each other in order to align across standards.

Episode List

Launch and Introduction

This is the introductory episode of I Never Metadata, the podcast all about Metadata. In this episode I talk about my plans for the podcast, topics I expect to cover, and how I hope to bring you all the good content about metadata that you want to know. 

Metadata Definition and Types

In this episode we start from the start. And there's no better way to begin than with a definition to lay the foundation. I also talk about the - not three - but four types of metadata that are commonly used to help you store, search for and find, manage and protect your content.

Standardization and Control

Standards are the essence of metadata. And control is the essence of standardization. In this episode I talk about the different types of standards applied to metadata including schemas, content standards, value standards and format standards (or encoding standards). I then discuss some well-used industry standards like Dublin Core and MODS, and how these three might crosswalk to each other in order to align across standards.

Ubiquity of Metadata

The episode runs through a few ways in which metadata is completely ubiquitous in our daily lives, It is everywhere, being captured in just about everything we do. Where will you see metadata in your daily activities today?

Semantics Part 1

The semantic web is an unrealized vision for the World Wide Web cooked up by the web's creator Tim Berners-Lee. It is the web that allows computers to process information - with context - without the need for human intervention.

Semantics Part 2

The second episode in our Semantics series covers the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and Unique Resource Identifiers (URIs) and uses a roast chicken search result from AllRecipes to show how semantic wrappers really improve the search experience.

Semantics Part 3

The last episode in our Semantics series goes in-depth into RDF, SPARQL, SKOS and Triples, explaining how these, combined with microdata as found on Schema.org and other open linked data sources, provide the semantic context to help computers "understand" what is being described on a web page.

Guest - Lisa Grimm

Our first guest speaker Lisa Grimm talks about her experience leading DAM and taxonomy teams for global content discovery programs. Listen in to hear about her experience managing global information governance, standards compliance, and managing a metadata emergency.

Ode to the Z39.19 -

Part 1

In this episode I wax admiring of a document that has reduced my own headache in learning how to develop controlled vocabularies. The Z39.19 Guidelines for the Construction, Format and Management of Monolingual Controlled Vocabularies may be ten years old, but it is still relevant and useful.

Ode to the Z39.19 -

Part 2

This is the second half of the Ode to the Z39.19 Guidelines that covers the second half of the document and includes insights around the display and format of the controlled vocabulary, considerations around interoperability, the constructions, testing and maintenance of the vocabularies as well as a section about management system considerations. So much good detail!

Personal Collections: Interview with David Ho and Lori Baluta

This week I invited two new and fascinating friends of mine to talk about their personal digital and physical asset collections and how they acquire, store, organize and catalog them. Lori Baluta and David Ho are two absolute bibliophiles who make use of spreadsheets, Library Thing, and other tools to manage their collections, and they grapple with issues of word order, preservation against damaging sunlight and other details to help them maintain their treasured personal collections.

Embedded Metadata: Interview with David Riecks

In this episode I invited David Riecks to discuss embedded photo metadata. He tells me about his experience in going from applying metadata to an accompanying database, to embedding it in the file itself, but then how ultimately, his philosophy is that, it is not whether to do one or the other, but to do both.